An actor’s life for me

curtains

If all the classroom’s a stage, and you a mere player, perhaps this list will help you reflect on your role: choose the statements that describe you the most and see what score you get. “I usually enter my classroom with a theatrical flourish” – no, not me. “I sometimes feign anger when students don’t hand in their homework” – hmmmm.

As a counterpoint to this optimistic view of ‘teaching with passion’, there is an opinion that teacher development doesn’t focus enough on the performing aspect of teaching. Time for a video observation, maybe?

10 thoughts on “An actor’s life for me

  1. Reblogged this on So, You Think You Can Teach ESL? and commented:
    I do think being a teacher is part teaching, and part acting. Perhaps teachers should take an acting class or two during their undergrad years?

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      • Well, go for it!
        Sharing my own experience of ‘acting & teaching, I must say that you do need this skill when you are working with YLs: miming activities, TPR approach, songs and chants with gestures, classroom management tricks etc.
        Before I entered EFL faculty, I had graduated from the pedagogical college where I had studied to be a Music teacher. I still remember those years – I had to perform so many roles on stage ( for New Year ‘kapustniki’ – amateur stand up shows, and Santa Clause 7 times in one day – being the tallest girl in a 99% female college) that I had to give up being a shy stuttering teenager.
        So why not bring a bit of fun and diversity into your life? 😉 BTW, there are English-language acting schools as well )

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      • Yes, yes! All these things can be useful for adult teaching as well. Sometimes my adult students ask me if I usually teach more YLs 🙂 (of course, like I said in another comment here, we don’t want too much fun at the expense of learning!)

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    • Reblogged this on You Suck At TEFL. I don’t think most teachers realize just how important this is. Half of my job is keeping my students eyes open and focused on what I want them to do. The more physical you can make your lesson and teaching, the more captivating it will be.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: The non-verbal teacher | Kate's Crate

  3. Pingback: Who’d like to be a rock star? | Kate's Crate

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